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 You're no fun... 
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Joined: Fri Mar 18, 2011 9:26 pm
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Unread post You're no fun...
To: Cpt********.1465.UNSC.THESEUS
From: ISitInA.ERROR DATA UNAVAILABLE
Origin: ERROR DATA UNAVAILABLE
Received:
Sent: ERROR DATA UNAVAILABLE
Classifications: Captain's Eyes Only, Message Archival Allowed, Neural Net Upload Permissions Denied
Attachments: 2 (AT224678A, AT74B135A1, total 67 Mb)
Subject: You're no fun...

Captain,

I'd like to start off this data packet by saying I'm disappointed. I made sure to personally be in charge of the Rising Dread (seriously, they need to make Prowler names more cheerful) just so that we could meet face to face. I even had a bottle of brandy that I was going to slip you.

These things happen, though. And no, don't bother calling up video. Old training gives you an instinctual knowledge of where the cameras are and how to avoid them. Old habits from HUMINT die hard, you know.

But anyway, onto other things.

As part of the indoctrination process, all Orions are taught to revere not only the first generation of any iteration, but to revere any previous generation. Trainers usually attempt to reinforce this mindset whenever possible. The idea of “never leave a man behind” is also heavily pushed home, with the exception of destroying the body.

This wasn't simply done for morale purposes, but for the sake of intelligence as well. As you know, even during the war there were still heavy Insurrectionist activities in some areas, and some worlds took the opportunity to secede from the UNSC. In fact, many saw the UNSC as seizing too much power during the war, and used it as a reason to secede.

The Orions represented a distinct edge over the insurrectionists, both in manpower and technology. Bringing them home wasn't simply military sentimentality, but also a dire need to prevent the enemy from having the opportunity to possibly reverse-engineer even a fraction of the procedures used.

It's an ironic note that F484 was used as a live demonstration twice for this matter. Once during training for his own generation, and once for the second generation.

The chemicals used to enter one into a state of “hyperlearning” as some call it (Orion-IVs called it cramming for obvious reasons) were called, for obvious reasons, cram packs. There were side effects, however, including neural degradation and the possibility of entering these periods without the use of them. They referred to this state as “gone eyes,” due to the way that their eyes would lock open in an attempt to receive more input. This usually happened days after a stressful situation such as combat.

There are only two cases recorded of this happening during combat. Once, you've already listened to. During his spasms, F484 accidentally activated all of his medical systems. Biofoam was injected into perceived wounds (though none actually existed) and all stimulants, medicines, and cram packs were injected into his body. This, combined with a spin in the dead of space, watching plasma fire and boiling hulls, caused a comatose state in him that lasted three months. (This doesn't count time in cryo.)

It has further been suggested, due to his heavy use of cram packs, that F484 had become addicted to them. With his rather negative reaction but high retention, it is difficult to believe... but not implausible.

He appeared to bounce back rather quickly, and was within a month cleared for active duty once again, though the medical files taken from this time are still beyond my reach. (That worries me.) During this time he occupied himself with councilors, catching up with his instructors, and even helping with the training of the recruits. For all of this, he appeared to have come out no worse for the wear, save a slight hesitation on any mission that involved EVA duties.

Sincerely,

Chair
*************
Note by Hive: Captain, I have encountered additional encrypted data within this message. The encryption keys are old enough to be added to my own databanks upon my creation due to our frequent status in the outer regions of humanity's occupied zone, in case we encountered any of the number of missing ships from the war. Below is the unencrypted message.
*************
You always wanted to know everything. It wasn't the cramming that you relished, but the knowledge that you knew just that much more than the people around you.
*************

Quote:
Audio Transcript 224678A, Operation: SWORDFISH

F484: Don't bump into anything and you're good to go. Over.
A467: Launching in three, two, one...
(PAUSE, 46.12 SECONDS)
F484: Bay doors aren't closing. Going manual.
Crewman Bradley: (KLAXONS IN BACKGROUND) Aye, sir.
A467: Package one in position. Over.
B438: Package two in position. Over.
E479: Package three in position. Over.
C468: Package four in position. Over. (PAUSE, 0.7 SECONDS) Honor, fire the cannon. Over.
Crewman Marx: (PEOPLE SPEAKING IN BACKGROUND) MAC firing.
B438: Shields are down. Beginning the operation. Over.
E489: (CURTLY) Plasma heading your way, Honor. Over.
Crewman 2: (YELLING IN BACKGROUND) Hard to starboard! Fire the-(NOISES CEASE)
C468: Broke apart fine. Landed fine. All units green. Check.
B438: Two, green.
A467: One, green.
(PAUSE, 2.4 SECONDS)
E479: Three, green. Beginning op. Over.
(PAUSE, 27.2 SECONDS)
F484: (CALM TONE) Foxtrot four-eight-four to Foxtrot four-two-two, over.
(PAUSE, 10.0 SECONDS)
F484: Foxtrot four-eight-four to Delta four-six-niner, over.
(PAUSE, 9.8 SECONDS)
F484: (NERVOUS TONE) Foxtrot four-eight-four to Bravo four-zero-six, over.
B406: Foxtrot, I don't have much time. I can't contact the bridge and systems are flickering bad. Over.
F484: Bravo, sixty percent of the ship is gone. Link for video, over.
B406: Foxtrot four-eight-four, how are you getting this? Over. (PAUSE, 3.6 SECONDS) Are you equipped for EVA? Over.
F484: Negative, Bravo. (SPEAKING QUICKLY, BUT WITH ODD PAUSES MARKED) Barely able to slow* down my* spin* over.
B406: (COMBINATION OF CURIOUS AND NERVOUS TONE) Say again Foxtrot, over.
F484: (SPEAKING MORE QUICKLY) Barely- (SOUND OF SHORT PAINED BREATHS CAUGHT IN THROAT)
B406: (BARKING) Foxtrot four-eight-four?
F484: (LONG INARTICULATE SCREAMS)
B406: (BARKING, COMMANDING TONE) Alpha four-one-niner, do you copy, over.
E477: (SOFT TONE) Roger, Bravo four-zero-six.
B406: Honor of Skies is dead. Foxtrot four-eight-four is EVA without equipment and has gone eyes. Estimated twelve minutes air. Can you get to a bird and retrieve? Over.
E477: (SPEAKING QUICKLY) I'll have to manual some doors but can do, over.

*************
Note by Hive: Captain, I have encountered additional encrypted data within this message. The encryption keys are old enough to be added to my own databanks upon my creation due to our frequent status in the outer regions of humanity's occupied zone, in case we encountered any of the number of missing ships from the war. Below is the unencrypted message.
*************
Two minutes to spare. Six hours before you could close your eyes peacefully. They didn't want to tell me. When they did, I broke noses.
*************


Quote:
(THREE KNOCKS ON A DOOR)
(DOOR OPENS)
J451: (BARKING) It is fifteen hundred hours! I am here to relieve you of duty! What is the status?
M427: (BARKING) No change!
J451: Do you accept the relief of
F484: (GROAN)
J451: (TRAILING OFF, AMAZEMENT) your... (PAUSE, 1.3 SECONDS)
J451: (BARKING) Hup!
(PAUSE, 4.7 SECONDS)
F484: (BARKING, AUTHORITATIVE TONE) Identify yourselves!
M427 & J451: (BARKING, IN UNISON) Sir!
M427: Mike four-two-seven, sir!
J451: Juliet four-five-one, sir!
F484: Do you know who I am?
J451: Sir! You are Foxtrot four-eight-four, sir!
F484: Then do you know my rank?
M427: Sir! Yes, sir! You are a Petty Officer Second Class, sir!
F484: Then why do you keep calling me sir?! I am enlisted!
M427 & J451: (BARKING, NOT IN UNISON) Yes, Petty Officer!
F484: (CONTINUES BARKING) Where am I and how did I get here?
M427: You are in the east wing, room 127 of the Bravo infirmary of Olympus Base, Petty Officer!
J451: You were brought here after your last mission, Petty Officer! (PAUSE, 2.1 SECONDS) We are not privy to the details of your mission, Petty Officer!
F484: What are your duties?
J451: To watch over you until you awaken, Petty Officer!
F484: And you will tell me why!
M427: To show us to respect the pain and sacrifice of all G1 Orions, Petty Officer!
F484: Partial answers receive no credit, Mike four-two-seven! Juliet four-five-one, do you know the full answer?
J451: To show us to respect the pain and sacrifice of all G1 and previous iteration Orions, who have suffered so that we will not, Petty Officer!
F484: (SOFTLY, TO HIMSELF) Good.
FR84: (BARKING WITH AUTHORITY) Is that all?
M427: To teach us that Orions bring each other home, Petty Officer!
F484: Are there any exceptions?
J427: Only when retrieval is not an option, in which case destruction must be guaranteed, Petty Officer!
F484: That's right! (PAUSE, 2.5 SECONDS) You will assume your post to watch over me until ordered otherwise by an officer or medical official.
J427: Yes, Petty Officer!
F484: You will find the nearest medical official and inform them that I am awake and ambulatory!
M427: Yes, Petty Officer!
F484: Dismissed, Mike four-two-seven!


Fri Mar 18, 2011 10:47 pm
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Joined: Fri Mar 18, 2011 4:35 pm
Posts: 42
Unread post Re: You're no fun...
Chair,

Sorry for missing you, but I'm sure you can understand my hesitation to trust any foreign personnel aboard my vessel, especially a spook ship- no offense. Had I known, I would've requested a complimentary inspection of each vessel by the visiting and receiving commanding officers, per nonessential naval protocol 11-B47644, subsection 8C. However, since such an inspection is nonessential and by invitation only, I decided to forgo it for the sake of security. Now I'm craving brandy.

Where would F484 be able to procure cram packs if he was indeed addicted to them? Would he be able to get them through official channels or would he have to resort to the black markets? For that matter...how common is this 'gone eyes' symptom? Would it be noticed by fellow crew members or co-workers?

By the way, next time you decided to slingshot around a sun to show up at my doorstep, at least bring girl scout cookies, won't you? The matching outfit would be appreciated, though not expected. ;)


Fri Mar 18, 2011 11:12 pm
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Joined: Fri Mar 18, 2011 9:26 pm
Posts: 47
Unread post Re: You're no fun...
Captain,

Not much time on my end at the moment. Like I said, I'm a busy bee. (I feel sort of silly saying that. Spacebees and all. I've been reading up on the history of the Theseus and also the Seabees. You must be proud.)

It's not a problem. I didn't have the ability to warn you, after all. I wasn't sure if I was in charge of this op until they checked to see if we really should dock. What else were we supposed to do? Dump everything onto the planet and make you retrieve it? I worry about people some days.

"Gone eyes," as the Orions called it, was both a pressing concern and a non-issue for quite a while. It didn't happen in combat, surprisingly, but down time. This wasn't an issue since after the war started most Orions went from one battlefield to the next with almost all their time in-between in cryo. During Christmas they'd give out "vitamin shots" that tests said would keep them from going eyes for a few days but... The process was never perfected.

If he was addicted (and I still maintain my personal belief that he wasn't) then he would have had to gotten them from the same places that they kept the medical packs for the Kavacha armor systems. He would have had to hack the inventory system, too, in order to keep his actions from being discovered. If he's getting them now? God only knows. He'd need a microbology lab to keep the supply up, plus the recipe, plus the materials, plus plenty of time to make the stuff.

We don't really make much any more for obvious reasons. The brain was never meant to handle that kind of learning. We actually keep it now for therapy reasons. The G3 IVs occasionally need a small dose, maybe once a year, in order to keep their brains working properly. It's not a good measure, but it's the best we've been able to come up with. We also occasionally use it as a "special treatment" for occasional (rare) use. It's all kept under such lock and key it isn't even funny. Just to move 4cc's of it, you need a six man guard team that's monitored the entire time.

Wow, that's a lot for a girl with negative time on her hands and too much HUMINT to review.

Now, for the most surprising part before I sign off... Captain, are you flirting with me?

Sincerely,

Chair


Fri Mar 18, 2011 11:49 pm
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Unread post Re: You're no fun...
Chair,

Flirting? I dare say, that wouldn't be very professional, would it? Let's just call it fraternization with the intention of keeping up morale.

I myself am I busy bee. And your A.I. isn't helping matters. I see ONI doesn't prioritize teaching their A.I.'s manners.


Sat Mar 19, 2011 12:08 am
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